These screen savers were once included in the XScreenSaver distribution, but have since been retired.

Click on the thumbnails for a video preview.

Ant

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 4.22.

A cellular automaton that is really a two-dimensional Turing machine: as the heads ("ants") walk along the screen, they change pixel values in their path. Then, as they pass over changed pixels, their behavior is influenced.

Wikipedia: "Langton's ant"
Wikipedia: "Turing machine"

Written by David Bagley; 1997.

Bubbles

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

This simulates the kind of bubble formation that happens when water boils: small bubbles appear, and as they get closer to each other, they combine to form larger bubbles, which eventually pop.

Written by James Macnicol; 1996.

Critical

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Draws a system of self-organizing lines. It starts out as random squiggles, but after a few iterations, order begins to appear.

Written by Martin Pool; 1999.

Flag

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

This draws a waving colored flag, that undulates its way around the screen. The flag can contain arbitrary text and images. By default, it displays either the current system name and OS type, or a picture of "Bob".

Written by Charles Vidal and Jamie Zawinski; 1997.

Forest

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Fractal trees.

Written by Peter Baumung; 1997.

GLForestFire

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Draws an animation of sprinkling fire-like 3D triangles in a landscape filled with trees.

Written by Eric Lassauge; 2002.

HyperBall

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.10. It has been replaced by the more general "Polytopes" screen saver, which can display this object as well as others. The Polytopes "120-cell" object corresponds to this one.

Hyperball is to hypercube as dodecahedron is to cube: this displays a 2D projection of the sequence of 3D objects which are the projections of the 4D analog to the dodecahedron. Technically, it is a "120 cell polytope".

Wikipedia: "Hypercube"
Wikipedia: "Regular polytope"

Written by Joe Keane; 2000.

HyperCube

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.10. It has been replaced by the more general "Polytopes" screen saver, which can display this object as well as others.

This displays 2D projections of the sequence of 3D objects which are the projections of the 4D analog to the cube: as a square is composed of four lines, each touching two others; and a cube is composed of six squares, each touching four others; a hypercube is composed of eight cubes, each touching six others. To make it easier to visualize the rotation, it uses a different color for the edges of each face. Don't think about it too long, or your brain will melt.

Wikipedia: "Hypercube"
Wikipedia: "Tesseract"
Wikipedia: "Regular polytope"

Written by Joe Keane, Fritz Mueller, and Jamie Zawinski; 1992.

Juggle

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.09. It has been replaced by the "Juggler3D" screen saver.

Written by Tim Auckland; 2002.

Laser

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Moving radiating lines, that look vaguely like scanning laser beams. (Frankie say relax.)

Written by Pascal Pensa; 1997.

Lightning

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Crackling fractal lightning bolts.

Written by Keith Romberg; 1997.

Lisa

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Lissajous loops.

Wikipedia: "Lissajous curve"

Written by Caleb Cullen; 1997.

Lissie

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Lissajous loops. This one draws the progress of circular shapes along a path.

Wikipedia: "Lissajous curve"

Written by Alexander Jolk; 1997.

LMorph

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

This generates random spline-ish line drawings and morphs between them.

Written by Sverre H. Huseby and Glenn T. Lines; 1995.

Mismunch

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08. It was merged with the "Munch" screen saver.

Munching errors! This is a creatively broken misimplementation of the classic munching squares graphics hack. See the "Munch" screen saver for the original.

Wikipedia: "HAKMEM"
Wikipedia: "Munching square"

Written by Steven Hazel; 2004.

Rotor

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Draws a line segment moving along a complex spiraling curve.

Written by Tom Lawrence; 1997.

Sphere

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Draws shaded spheres in multiple colors.

Written by Tom Duff and Jamie Zawinski; 1982, 1997.

Spiral

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Moving circular moiré patterns.

Written by Peter Schmitzberger; 1997.

T3D

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Draws a working analog clock composed of floating, throbbing bubbles.

Written by Bernd Paysan; 1999.

Vines

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Generates a continuous sequence of small, curvy geometric patterns.

Written by Tracy Camp and David Hansen; 1997.

Whirlygig

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Zooming chains of sinusoidal spots.

Written by Ashton Trey Belew; 2001.

Worm

This screen saver was removed from the XScreenSaver distribution as of version 5.08.

Draws multicolored worms that crawl around the screen.

Written by Brad Taylor, Dave Lemke, Boris Putanec, and Henrik Theiling; 1991.

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