Fucking Apple.

Why does my Mac now do this every time I log in?

No amount of saying "yes" makes it stop.

Why does my iPad do this every time I plug it in?

While it is saying the above, the progress bar at the bottom gives every indication that it is, in fact, backing up and syncing music. Maybe it's not, but it looks like it. And yet here we are.

Why does my iPhone not do this when I plug it in locked, but only the iPad?

And about one time in ten, the iPad's screen does this instead. I have complied at least a dozen times and it keeps coming back:

Xcode is able to install development apps onto both the iPhone and iPad, so they are most assuredly "trusted" by this computer at what I had previously believed was the most fundamental level.

I feel so "secure". There's so much "trust" I can hardly stand it.

Previously, previously, previously.
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40 Responses:

  1. Jon says:

    I haven't seen the first two, but the "Trust This Computer" thing happens every time I connect my iPhone to my Mac. Until a few weeks ago that phone was only ever connected to one computer and it still had to ask if it could be trusted every. single. time.

  2. NuclearMonster says:
    1

    What versions of the various operating systems are installed?

    • jwz says:
      1

      In what way will my answer affect your answer?

      • NuclearMonster says:
        19

        I guess I'd be surprised and assume you were replaced with an alien at this point if the answer to any kind of attempt to help you wasn't like this.

        • jwz says:
          5

          Well that's because I don't need your "did you try turning it off and on again sir" bullshit. This is not my first rodeo.

          • NuclearMonster says:
            9

            it might help me or someone else find the answer.

            • the hatter says:

              I suspect the odds are much higher of someone here recognising the output and asking 'are you running 3.6.2 on this and 7.1a on that ?  I had this until I upgraded to .1b and rolled back to 3.6.0 until 3.7 will fix it'.  Unless this happens in a myriad of circumstances, which from the other responses looks not to be the case.

            • bq Mackintosh says:
              10

              You're familiar with how things go around here, so I'm pretty surprised by this response. Not because our host is Always Right; but because our host has extraordinarily simple criteria for answers to these kinds of questions. Namely, Please respond if you have concrete and specific insight into this situation; please do not respond if you have questions that "might help me <strike>answer</strike> find the answer to" the question.

              Very in particular: the reminder that "this isn't my first rodeo" likely isn't just an indicator that we all understand how to file a bug report. It's a reminder that the context around these parts isn't just conventional make-it-stop-doing-what-I-don't-like tech support, but rather a serious systems coder asking for insight into the specific mechanics at play here.

              Answers in the form of "I had this until I upgraded to .1b and rolled back to 3.6.0 until 3.7 will fix it" aren't what's desired. Answers in the form of, "As of release .1b Apple's iCloud authentication system is freeloading on ArgleBargle 1.7, which in turn makes calls to FloopBlink. ArgleBargle 1.7 and FloopBlink have incompatible timeout mechanisms, which causes a technically true report of noauth back to iCloud, and iCloud in turn writes 'this user doesn't exist' into its log. XCode uses a different gateway to ArgleBargle plus reports different data, so a different outcome isn't entirely surprising." — that's a helpful response to a person who actively codes things to work with these systems.

              "I might be able to find an Apple support article" is not a helpful response.

              • 5

                Answers in the form of "I had this until I upgraded to .1b and rolled back to 3.6.0 until 3.7 will fix it" aren't what's desired. Answers in the form of, "As of release .1b Apple's iCloud authentication system is freeloading on ArgleBargle 1.7, which in turn makes calls to FloopBlink. ArgleBargle 1.7 and FloopBlink have incompatible timeout mechanisms, which causes a technically true report of noauth back to iCloud, and iCloud in turn writes 'this user doesn't exist' into its log. XCode uses a different gateway to ArgleBargle plus reports different data, so a different outcome isn't entirely surprising." — that's a helpful response to a person who actively codes things to work with these systems.

                This is a genuinely great explanation of something I've struggled many times to articulate. I am hereby stealing this and using it in all my future interactions of this type.

              • J. Peterson says:
                3

                Now is likely not the time to mention that Apple now expects you to buy hardware to lock your home's front door, and expects you to reliably unlock it with your phone.

                Unless, of course, FloopBlink and ArgleBargle 1.7 have incompatible timeout mechanisms.

  3. Michael says:
    2

    I have an old iPad as a third screen connected to my Mac. Every time I reboot the computer or the iPad I have to put my code in again as well. I have not found a way to actually disable it.

    In general it seems “trust” is temporary with macOS these days. So many things that only required me to approve once now pop up over and over again. Safari has also started to remove plugins every time it has an update.

    I feel so much safer.

  4. MrSpookTower says:

    It's obvious.  You have to pre-approve before pre-approving.

  5. bubblun says:
    3

    It’s Apple’s software quality in general that’s been slipping for years now. Basic interactions that used to define the company as delivering “just works” experiences do not work as expected any more. Features, features über alles.

    As things are, there will never again be a Snow Leopard kind of release. By running ahead, Apple is actually falling behind. The thing is: it’s still the best game in town. Everything else is just *that* bad.

  6. sleep says:

    haven't updated my mac in a while, but it's incredible how many things went to crap after the update to iOS 16. i use the iphone's dictation feature to alleviate my RSI, and it legitimately went from being about 90% (for most of a decade now) to less than half of that all of a sudden. predictive text seems worse for wear, too. i really have no idea how these degradations could have occurred, let alone left to fester for months after launch

  7. tfb says:
    1

    Lots of people are now going to give lots of answers all of which are wrong.  The correct answer is that your mac is infested with daemons who are working ceaselessly against you.  I don't mean some silly background process: I mean creatures with horns and/or tentacles who have leaked into your machine as a result of certain ill-advised working practices at Apple.  The solution does not involve turning it off and on again: it involves holy water, incantations and, in extreme cases, a battlefield nuclear weapon.

  8. Dan says:

    Apple "security" drives me insane.  I get asked all the time to trust my Windows computer, but only if my phone is plugged into it when I boot.  If I just plug it in after it's booted, it's fine.  And also, I go through cycles (I'm in one right now) where my phone asks for my Apple account password several times a day.  Sometimes the account is actually locked as well.  Near as I can figure someone's trying to access my account.  I contacted Apple to ask them if there's a way to find out why my account keeps getting locked, but they were about as helpful as you'd expect.

    And of course, every time I get an iOS upgrade I have to do all the security setup twice: once immediately after installation, and then (because I don't use a passcode or 2FA I guess) I have to go in and repeat all the exact same steps to make the red notification badge go away on my Settings.  Asking me after an upgrade?  OK, fine, sure, maybe there's new options and I need to be aware of them.  But making me do it again after I just did it?  Grrrr.

    • Not Frank says:

      Wait, you can make the red notification badge on settings go away when you don't use a passcode/whatnot? I just moved Settings into a folder to improve ignorability.

      • Dan says:

        Yeah, immediately go into Settings and do the exact same "Setup" you just had to do when the phone updated.

    • jwz says:
      8

      Apple's undeniable failings aside, I'm just kind of sitting here holding my knees and rocking back and forth at the idea that people are just out there without passcodes. I mean, sure, it's your prerogative to go through life licking doorknobs and rawdogging hobos, but... wow. Just wow.

      • Dan says:
        2

        Needing a passcode assumes you ever leave the house and anyone else could ever possibly access your phone.  Even in the Before Times it was a relatively rare occurrence, now even less likely.  I had a doctors appointment recently and had to fill up my car for the first time in 16 months.

        The doorknobs and hobos are totally my business.

        • Jon says:
          1

          Good thing your house is 100% secure from thieves & law enforcement, huh?

          • Dan says:
            3

            Not everyone lives in constant fear.  And of course, I don't live my life on a phone, I could lose it tomorrow, unlocked and it wouldn't cause any problems (besides replacing it).

            • Jon says:
              1

              Not everyone lives in constant fear.

              There's a lot of middle ground between living in constant fear on the one hand, and pretending that nothing bad ever happens on the other. It's not all or nothing.

              • Dan says:
                2

                You seem to think it's a certainty that my phone will be stolen either by thieves or law enforcement.  Perhaps you live in an area or have a lifestyle where there's a lot of risk in that regard.  I don't.

                • Jon says:

                  "Certainty"? Again with the all or nothing thinking.

                  I think the odds of my phone being stolen or seized or lost are pretty low. I don't spend any time worrying about it because I lock my phone.

                  • Dan says:
                    1

                    The "all or nothing" thinking is coming from you.  "Someone could break into your house (thieves or law enforcement) and take your phone, therefore you must have a passcode and lock it at all times." and "Someone getting access to your phone would be a disaster, therefore you must have a passcode and lock it at all times".

                • tfb says:

                  I live somewhere where I don't worry too much about people breaking into my house.  If I go out for an hour I often don't lock my door.  I generally don't lock it when I'm in, at all.

                  But if I go away for a week, I do, except occasionally I forget.  And it would be pretty cool if the door lock had the ability to notice when I'm away for more than some given time and lock itself then.  But it doesn't because it's just a lock, made out of bits of metal.

                  Wouldn't it be amazing if my phone, through the wonders of modern programming, had an option that said 'don't lock yourself unless I've been away more than x minutes', so that I'd only ever need to authenticate myself to it when I'd been away for long enough?  Oh, wait...

                  • Dan says:
                    1

                    I just don't ever care if it locks at all, which people seem to have a hard time grasping.  And on my phone, the longest "long enough" is 5 minutes.  If I could do, say, 4 hours?  Maybe I'd actually consider it.  But I don't want to have to keep unlocking my phone dozens of times per day for no reason.

      • Clem says:
        2

        I can't imagine a phone with no passcode anymore.

        But:  I have an iPad with no passcode.

        Why?  Special use case.  My iPad is frequently used by my 9 year old who cannot handle passcodes due to his learning disability and fine motor skills.  But he can handle accessing PBS apps and Disney+ just fine.  The iPad isn't tied to any of my real accounts except for the Disney+ login.

      • Andre says:
        1

        Warning. In re-reading the following, I find have no actual point. But still. Well, in answer to your original question, you have already given the answer “Because fuck you” as Apple’s new mantra. Re the passcode thing though. A close friend of mine, with increasingly troublesome Parkinson related cognitive deficiencies, locked herself out of her iPhone. And, I was trying to get it to work for her, and of course she had no idea what an Apple Id was, and of course she had no idea what the password was, and of course she had no idea who her closest friend as a teenager was, in answer to the security questions, but eventually, with her husband’s help, I guessed a few things that turned out to be correct, and after making us wait a mere 14 days Apple let my friend back into her phone. And, so sue me, I set it up without a passcode, lest she lock herself out again from her lifeline to the world she can remember, and to people who can help her. So that’s why some people don’t use passcodes.

  9. Donny says:
    2

    The need to unlock it prior to backup/sync probably has to do with the USB Restricted Mode they added to lock out Cellebrite and similar attackers.  The intermittent nature might be explained by the fact that it only engages after it's been locked and idle for an hour.  Not sure why it shows up as still syncing prior to unlock; my conjecture is that it's using a slower connection over Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, or just lying.  I don't have a Mac to test, and I don't see that behavior with iTunes syncing on windows.

    Not sure about the rest... it might be similar "armor" against attackers, or it might just be buggy crap.  I'd place even odds on that bet.

  10. Markus F says:
    4

    iOS 16.1 and iPadOS 16.1 both introduce a new "security feature" that requires a device passcode prompt to initiate any kind of device data backup. There is currently no way around this.

    • Markus F says:
      1

      PS: Will also happen after upgrading to 15.7.1 - not just 16.1.
      Automatic private (= local) backups of Apple mobile devices are no longer possible.

  11. Nate says:
    1

    I believe the "always ask for passcode" thing is a temporary workaround for this exploit:

    https://theevilbit.github.io/posts/cve-2022-32929/

    I would assume they're working on a more in-depth and less annoying fix, but who knows?

  12. Levent says:

    Re-enabling iCloud and disallowing all apps to use iCloud did the trick for me. It is iPad air 1 with some updated to last but older version of iOS.

    Before re-enabling, iTunes, apple id etc. asked my password every some day, drives me nuts. At some point, it even suspend my account, because I don't wanted to enter a password every time. Re-enabling iCloud fixes the problem. Somehow apple linked those logins with iCloud, it handles them automatically.

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