Sony Scopeman


Niklas Fauth:

Hardware Design files of a replacement mainboard for the Sony Watchman FD-10. This turns it into a bluetooth and WiFi-enabled vector display.

In "Audio" mode, the ESP32 acts as a bluetooth speaker. Play back audio files from your smartphone or laptop to hear and see the soundwaves. You can change the size by adjusting the playback volume.

In "Video" mode, the ESP32 renders the result of the Lorenz Attractor equation. You can change the simulation speed using the "Tune" knob.

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5 Responses:

  1. Ben says:

    That's very impressive. I'm surprised the original doesn't just dump x-rays, CRT displays were heavy for a reason.

    None of your previouslies link to oscilloscope music which is what you'd presumably play on that thing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XziuEdpVUe0

    • phuzz says:

      I don't know if it's intentional, but because the CRT fires upwards, hitting the screen at an angle, any x-rays produced should go out the top of the device, not towards the viewer.
      It's probably fine. Hopefully.

      • phuzz says:

        Only just noticed this sticker on the inside of the case, from the linked page: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/NiklasFauth/sony-scopeman/main/pictures/photo_2021-01-13_22-03-34.jpg

      • cw says:

        There are two things that help here. The x-ray intensity is proportional to the acceleration voltage. Larger CRTs have to use higher voltages because they need to put more energy 'down the pipe' to light up more phosphor area per unit time. I had some 19" HP sync-on-green monstrosities that used 26kV. Conversely, the little ~1.5" screens used in the Tektronix jacket-pocket scopes got away with <1kV. The other thing that helps is that if you don't need to be able to be able to see through your x-ray shielding (ie leaded glass) you can use a MUCH thinner (lighter) shield. There are reasons to decelerate those electrons a -little- gently, of course ('Bremsstrahlung').

      • cw says:

        There are two things that help here. The x-ray intensity is proportional to the acceleration voltage. Larger CRTs have to use higher voltages because they need to put more energy 'down the pipe' to light up more phosphor area per unit time. I had some 19" HP sync-on-green monstrosities that used 26kV. Conversely, the little ~1.5" screens used in the Tektronix jacket-pocket scopes got away with less than 1kV. The other thing that helps is that if you don't need to be able to be able to see through your x-ray shielding (ie leaded glass) you can use a MUCH thinner (lighter) shield. There are reasons to decelerate those electrons a -little- gently, of course ('Bremsstrahlung').

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