Eudora

Computer History Museum releases Eudora source code:

The discussion with Qualcomm for the release of the Eudora source code by the company's museum took five years. In the end, they decided not to simply grant a license, but to transfer ownership of the code, the Eudora trademarks, the copyrights, and the Eudora domain names to the Computer History Museum (CHM). The transfer agreement allows us to publish the code under the very liberal BSD open source license, which means that anyone can use it for either personal or commercial purposes.

The source code we are distributing is what we received from Qualcomm, with only the following changes:

  • addition of the CHM copyright notice and the BSD license
  • sanitization of "bad words", mostly in comments, as requested by Qualcomm
  • removal of third-party software that neither the museum nor Qualcomm has the right to distribute

The Windows version of Eudora is written in C++. The source tree consists of 8,651 files in 565 folders, taking up 458 MB. There are both production ("Eudora71") and test ("Sandbox") versions of the code.

The Macintosh version of Eudora is an entirely different code base and is written in C. The source tree consists of 1,433 files in 47 folders, taking up 69.9 MB.

Download.

Those obscenities in the comments are historically significant and I want to read them!

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18 Responses:

  1. Judging by the brief description of the windows version, I think we can assume that the historically significant swearing is just random keyboard smashes, an ode to the STL, and a suicide note.

  2. MattyJ says:

    1,400 files. How quaint!

    It probably took five years because they had to figure out how to repair a Visual SourceSafe database and dump the history manually.

    • James says:

      Naw. https://mailinabox.email

      Jamie the bad man is hurting me

    • margaret says:

      the odds of the eudora team needing to get code from a VSS db approaches 1/∞. the team was very disciplined and tight and they hated microsoft with a bright-white-hot passion for exactly the same reasons as our dear host. their inability to suffer the IT drones carrying the m$ water is legendary.

      • MattyJ says:

        Microsoft didn't buy SourceSafe from OneTree until 1994, a year after the initial commercial release of Eudora. They killed all but the Windows version at that time but I would still posit that the original code had a >0% chance of having been in SourceSafe at some point.

        In any case it would be cool if the museum had the history of the source in some format and would release it like that. Having the latest release/head is great but that's only part of the software story.

  3. AntaBaka says:

    I loved Eudora. Used it until quite recently (two years ago?) when I finally gave up on text only emails and moved to Thunderbird.

  4. John says:

    You know that "new mail" marimba riff? It was fun to see people's brains react when I played it in real life once during college concert band (Eudora was the college-wide default email client).

  5. I liked this part: The Windows version of Eudora is written in C++. The source tree consists of 8,651 files in 565 folders, taking up 458 MB. There are both production ("Eudora71") and test ("Sandbox") versions of the code. The Macintosh version of Eudora is an entirely different code base and is written in C. The source tree consists of 1,433 files in 47 folders, taking up 69.9 MB.

  6. J. Peterson says:

    Has anybody poked at the code to see if the fast search feature is there? My recollection is this was licensed from a 3rd party, and I'm curious if it came along with the rest of the source.

  7. margaret says:

    huh, i thought eudora was thunderballs, or whatever mailzilla was.

    steve dorner is probably yelling at someone right now.

    • Cat Mara says:

      IIRC, that was later: someone put out a version of Thunderbird under the Eudora name with Eudora keybindings & stuff. I don't think anyone was fooled.

      • Derek W says:

        IIRC that was Penelope ca. 2008, later renamed Eudora OSE. A valiant effort but it disappointed both Thunderbird _and_ Eudora users and quietly faded away.

  8. mdhughes says:

    Ha, the Mac version's quit flag:

    if (EjectBuckaroo) {Cleanup();ExitToShell();}

  9. Dusk says:

    The mood analysis feature (aka "flame score") is implemented in a file called "anal.c".

    This causes some hilarity in symbol naming (e.g, "AnalScan", "IsAnalHot", "AnalScanPeteInner"). Sadly, the text analysis engine doesn't appear to be included in the Mac source dump.

  10. Derek W says:

    They didn't strip out all the entertainment: the debug symbols are from a previous build, at least in the Mac archive, so a quick glance reveals

    fuckingGestalt
    DragFuckOff
    hasTonsOCrap
    crapSpot
    crappySuggestPtr
    crap
    crapStr

    Buy now before they clean those up, too.

    • Leonardo Herrera says:

      Yeah, a quick search for obscenities didn't give me any results. But there is some "crap" still around:


      class CStuffyDlg : public CFileDialog
      {
      private:
      CStatic m_CopyRightCrap;

      (From here.)

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