Why a Tax Break for Security Cameras Is a Terrible Idea

Why a Tax Break for Security Cameras Is a Terrible Idea

Law enforcement agencies around the country have been expanding their surveillance capabilities by recruiting private citizens and businesses to share their security camera footage and live feeds. The trend is alarming, since it allows government to spy on communities without the oversight, approval, or legal processes that are typically required for police.

EFF is opposing new legislation introduced in California by Assemblymember Marc Steinorth that would create a tax credit worth up to $500 for residents who purchase home security systems, including fences, alarms and cameras. In a letter, EFF has asked the lawmaker to strike the tax break for surveillance cameras, citing privacy concerns as well as the potential threat created by consumer cameras that can be exploited by botnets.

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3 Responses:

  1. Jason McHuff says:

    Shouldn't they already be getting a break on home insurance? It seems that an insurer would desire something that can be a prosecution aid as well as be a potential deterrent.

  2. I'd like to see the reverse - require any government agency with a camera pointed at public space to share the feed openly.

  3. I'd like to see the reverse - require any government agency with a camera pointed at public space to share the feed openly.

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