DNA Lounge update

DNA Lounge update, wherein there are photos.
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SOMA Nature Walk, series of tubes edition.

As I've noted before, this sewer is only barely big enough to ride a dirt-bike through. There's hardly room for an alligator to even turn around, let alone a Sarcosuchus.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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Viscera Cleanup Detail

The space-station janitor simulator:

Disaster! An alien invasion and subsequent infestation have decimated this facility. Many lives were lost, the facility was ruined and the aliens were unstoppable. All hope was lost until one survivor found the courage to fight back and put the aliens in their place!

It was a long and horrific battle as the survivor dueled with all manner of horrific life-forms and alien mutations, but our hero won out in the end and destroyed the alien menace! Humanity was saved!

Unfortunately, the alien infestation and the heroic efforts of the courageous survivors have left rather a mess thoughout the facility. As the janitor, it is your duty to get this place cleaned up.

Previously, previously.

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Narrow Streets SF

Narrowing a Residential Street: McAllister:

It's a pretty ordinary street in San Francisco. The buildings are primarily three-story Victorians divided into flats. Measured from building to building, the public right-of-way is 68′ 9″ -- a common width for residential streets in the city.

I want to highlight the total space we're setting aside for cars in the current setup. When we multiply the width of the lanes (38′ 9″) by the length of the block (425′), the result is more than 15,000 square feet of space for cars, just on a single block of McAllister Street.

We can now reuse the old center roadway -- nearly 40′ across -- in a more productive way. Assuming we build to three stories, we now have 45,000 square feet of buildable space where people can live, work, shop, and relax -- just on the 1400 block of McAllister.


The old segregated sidewalks (each 15′) are wide enough to become our new shared streets, built at a comfortable scale for people. Drivers respond to narrow streets by avoiding them when they can, and by moving very slowly -- no more than about 5 mph -- when they need to use them for local access. In a future post we'll look at how to supplement narrow streets with a network of arterials and boulevards where cars and transit can move more quickly. [...]

What type of places make a city great? To answer that it's helpful to think about the difference between "Places" and "Non-Places". Nathan Lewis defines them: Places are areas where things happen. [...] Non-Places are areas of the city where nothing happens. This includes:

  • Parking lots
  • Useless greenery (not a park, but landscaping where nobody goes)
  • Roadways and other transportation infrastructure
  • Areas around buildings which are not "destinations," and often have no real purpose
When we look at traditional cities outside of North America we can see a consistent pattern -- lots of "Place" and very little "Non-Place".

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Makeup Transit Authority

Lydia Cambron: Recreating defaced subway ads:



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May the Fourth be With You

The thing they never tell you at the Imperial Recruitment Center is just how much buffing and cyanoacrylate is involved once you get back to base:

"Trooper! What's your dirt doin' in Boss's hole??"

Also, push-ups in armor are just the worst.

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Ms Mr

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Dev

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