Fare evasion is terrorism.

Not paying for Muni is apparently a gateway drug to suicide bombing.

Police believe it is good policy for anti-terrorism enforcement to include patrolling public transit for fare evaders, according to the department's former top transit officer.

The SFMTA, which operates Muni, uses funding from federal anti-terrorism grants to pay for fare evasion enforcement, via a group called the Muni Task Force.

Fare-evasion enforcement is a way to catching more serious criminals, Ali said, "who in some cases possess firearms while on Muni coaches."

Homeland Security representatives told The Examiner that extracurricular use of the funds may be legal if the Police Department says catching fare cheats is an anti-terror tactic, and if no one openly complains about the practice.

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9 Responses:

  1. mattyj says:

    So, where do I go to openly complain about the practice? If I can even figure out which practice they are referring to. (Calling fare jumping terrorism, or spending the money on 'extracurricular' activities?)

    I'd like to complain about both using online forms but I need to be sure I clicked on the right one.

  2. nooj says:

    Good thing anti-terror officers can carry machine guns! (In New York, anyway.) And good thing the furious complaints rolled back no policies.

    Also, the so-called Broken Windows Theory SFMTA is using here is bullshit and needs to be pursued with respect to broken police officers and police forces, if it's going to be applied to civilians.

  3. You know what's really good terrorism prevention? Random patrols of trains with bomb dogs. Or at least it would address the most popular way of terrorizing train passengers.

    I remember clearly the several month period when BART got a grant from DHS to do that. I don't think I've seen an officer walking a train since.

  4. You know what's really good terrorism prevention? Random patrols of trains with bomb dogs. Or at least it would address the most popular way of terrorizing train passengers.

    I remember clearly the several month period when BART got a grant from DHS to do that. I don't think I've seen an officer walking a train since.

  5. Not paying for training and arms to 3rd world militants engaged in proxy wars is a good way to prevent terrorism.

    • nooj says:

      But Charlie Wilson's War was such a success! We spent billions, and now they have schools, a functional system of government, and they're ready to be pressured into respecting our copyrights.

      Giving militants guns solved our problems, and created a pax Mecca.

      At least we gave them Russian guns. That's not bad and we don't have to feel bad.

  6. Not paying for training and arms to 3rd world militants engaged in proxy wars is a good way to prevent terrorism.

  7. jml says:

    Fare-evasion enforcement is a way to catching more serious criminals, Ali said, "who in some cases possess firearms while on Muni coaches."

    There was a case in Atlanta recently where a guy had gone on a killing spree of homeless (and sometimes not) people, and they actually caught him, with the murder weapon on him, after he jumped a turnstile at a MARTA stop. It still amazes me that the sequence of events played out that way. (NB: I'm not saying the policy here is in any way sound.)

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