Represent.

Tags: , ,

20 Responses:

  1. flipping_hades says:

    I saw that at the same time I was reading about the new features in C# 3.0, and thinking that it's getting more and more lisp-like with each rev.

    Every once in a while I still fire up Basilisk to run Macintosh Common LISP. On a Core 2 Duo, it's approximately 12 gajillion times faster than it ever was on a 68040.

  2. spike says:

    *makes ( ) gang sign*

  3. remaker says:

    Sorry, I just remember that from the "split-p soup" joke.

  4. jayp39 says:

    I don't think there's anything elegant about the following:
    ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))

    • wetzel says:

      you prefer

      									}
      }
      }
      }
      }
      }
      }
      }
      }
      }

      eh?

    • greyface says:

      It's not only elegant, it's worth making jokes about!
      "Plz read OP N try2," as the kids might say.

      However, it's not like it's difficult or hard to read if you use a decent editor or even remotely sane dev.environment.

    • flipzagging says:

      If you're going to be petty about the parens thing, try Haskell...

      (f(g(h(i(j 1 2 3))))) is roughly equivalent to f . g . h . i . j 1 2 3

      • blasdelf says:

        Haskell also has the lovely '$' operator for when you're currying functions, not just composing them. It basically funtions as a open paren that doesn't use a closing one.

  5. ch says:

    The Fahlman approves.

  6. grok_mctanys says:

    You forgot to copy the "title" attribute, which is as much a part of the strip as each of the panels.

  7. xach says:

    Come back, Shane!

  8. flipzagging says:

    Lisp users have children?

  9. ultranurd says:

    I've very much enjoyed reading xkcd. The thing about the patterns in floor tiles - true. I reread the whole archive when I discovered I had been missing the additional commentary in the image's title attribute.

  10. jef_poskanzer says:

    The title attribute thing annoys me because my stoopid browser truncates them.