Flashmob for Vendetta

"V" Meets The Secret Service: I want to think good things about random people dressing up as V and messing with dimwitted civil servants, but really I just think this is stupid.

(Also: though I think the comic is genius and the movie was pretty good, you know Guy Fawkes wasn't an anarchist, right? He was just another fucking religious fundie, in this case a nutjob Catholic who wanted to blow up the government because they were Protestant. I assume Jesus would have wanted it that way.)

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17 Responses:

  1. quercus says:

    Guy Fawkes himself was less a religious nutter than a co-religionist mercenary working for religious nutters (Catesby).

    • psr says:

      Well it did really suck to be a Catholic in England at that time.

      But yeah, the total ignorance of history in the movie (I don't know about the graphic novel), was annoy me, to the point that it spoiled the whole thing.

      • autopope says:

        When was the last Englishman hanged for being Catholic? Wasn't it 1720 or 1730 or thereabouts? (I know they were merrily hanging atheists in Scotland in 1704-6 ...)

        For the peanut gallery: religion was a political statement as much as a matter of belief in those days.

        (Alan Moore I will credit for being passingly familiar with English history, on account of being, er, English, but the movie producers have no such excuse.)

  2. bassfingers says:

    So a guy walks around in a mask and generally exchanges banter with folks, but is so ineffectual in his methods of persuasion that he ends up having to mail, what, three out of four petitions? Lame.

  3. rbeef says:

    I'm tempted to go tomorrow just to take a picture of the one guy in a mask, standing alone.

  4. badger says:

    I'm with you both on the "comic is genius and the movie was pretty cool" bit. As for the stunt itself, I'm thinking that managing to pull off walking around in a mask with even fake weapons in modern DC and getting neither mugged nor arrested is moderately impressive, but this really feels like an instance of the Heinlein quote "To be a nonconformist, you've got to wear the proper uniform".

    • angua2010 says:

      I'm thinking that managing to pull off walking around in a mask with even fake weapons in modern DC and getting neither mugged nor arrested is moderately impressive
      I guess that you get away more easily with this if you have someone with a camera running in front of you.

    • Agree -- I think the real heroes here are the cops who kept their cool. I'm pleasantly surprised.

  5. cr0wgrrl says:

    I think you're missing the point here. I'm quite sure the people involved had few expectations that they would actually be able to deliver the petitions personally.

    I think the point was to remind people that certain freedoms exist, like the freedom not to have to provide information about your identity to government officials. And the freedom to wear an outfit that prevents visual identification. That's something that a lot of people who don't live out here in San Francisco have forgotten. And they notified all of the official agencies, while masked, that there would be a larger peaceful masked gathering later in the month, and having proven it is possible to exercise those freedoms, encourage others to exercise those same freedoms themselves.

    I am exceedingly pleased that law enforcement kept their cool. It's good to know levelheadedness exists all around, for the most part.

    • postmaudlin says:

      This is gorgeously said. I agree. Also, I think it's easy to make fun of activists of all stripes but, you know, they're putting their bodies on the line to make a statement. That's more than most people I know. It even involves being out in the world. And caring about it.

    • strspn says:

      The problem here is that this person didn't have anything more than an abstract general grievance, upon which he wouldn't have standing in a court. People with actual grievances -- people whom we refer to as "aggravated" -- are rarely treated politely by the authorities, even when they are polite themselves. The real world is not planned in advance and videotaped by a news photographer.

  6. mackys says:

    Also: though I think the comic is genius and the movie was pretty good, you know Guy Fawkes wasn't an anarchist, right?

    I don't think people in America see Fawkes when they look at that mask. They see V. And he was an anarchist, and his story is a good example of why we shouldn't worship leaders just because they happen to be powerful. Given the times, it's hardly surprisingly us political lefties have an appreciation for V and his ideas. I'm not saying that's an excuse not to think, of course. But even a silly PR stunt can sometimes be useful, if it reminds people what matters.

  7. dzm6 says:

    So now it's Nov 15. Did anyone attend yesterday's larger group gathering to document one guy in a mask?

  8. doc_quixote says:

    As a Santarchist (http://www.santarchydc.com) who has shown up outside the White House unannounced as part of a medium-sized group of people (80-90) wearing masks (ok, beards) and matching costumes, I can say that this guy is probably gonna be disappointed by a lack of any real response from security (even assuming that he's joined by other Vs).