I, for one, welcome the new Atomic Aquamen

Navy Chief Submerges 2,000 Feet, Sets Record

A Navy diver submerged 2,000 feet, setting a record using the new Atmospheric Diving System (ADS) suit, off the coast of La Jolla, Calif., Aug. 1.

The ADS suit was designed and acquired by the Navy to support submarine rescue. "Its specific purpose is to be part of the advance assessment system during a submarine rescue operation," said Lehnhardt. "The diver in the suit will see what the damage to the sub is and find out where the survivors might be."

"The suit worked incredibly," said Jackson. "It did everything it was intended to do. I always heard that around 1,300 feet, the joints of the Hardsuit 2000 would work even better, and it worked exactly the way they said it would. [...] At 2,000 feet, I had topside turn off all the lights, and it was like a star show. The phosphorescence that was naturally in the water and in most of the sea life down there started to glow," Jackson said. "When I started to travel back up, all the lights looked like a shower of stars going down as I was coming up. It was the best ride in the world."

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28 Responses:

  1. ammutbite says:

    Wow, a pair of those divesuit shoes would be the ultimate club-wear item. They make NewRocks look like ballet slippers.

  2. theorb says:

    Re your tags, I'm not sure there's a lot in common between suits designed for 1 atm/near zero atm vs 1atm/62 atm.
    They don't have *nothing* in common, sure, but they also don't have hugely much in common. There's nowhere to sink heat to in a space suit. In a diving suit, the world's largest heatsink is all around you. In a diving suit, you've got to keep the outside world outisde, in a space suit, you're more worried about keeping the inside world inside. Implosion, explosion, too.
    In fact, I wonder if NASA actually uses the same design of suit in the neutral boyancy lab as they do in space. (They may well, in case of a water landing.)

  3. justmealex says:

    Huge brass balls.

  4. bitwise says:

    He took a duck in the face at two hundred and fifty knots.

  5. buz says:

    This really makes me want to pee.

  6. gytterberg says:

    That's frickin awesome and all but, how useful is the dude going to be in that suit at 2000 feet? I mean he doesn't even have hands in that thing. Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper to use a robot?

    • dojothemouse says:

      I think the real competitor here is saturation diving.

      • pnendick says:

        This is for submarine rescue and other commercial applications. Robots can't weld or torch - they have no leverage like a weighted diver does. Saturation divers can't be deployed quickly. Besides, it would be cool-as-fuck to dive in one of these. We don't need astronauts either but everyone wants to be one.

        I would chuck myself into one of these new 1-ATM suits in an instant and drop myself off the nearest continental shelf.

  7. kallisti says:

    It's the latest incarnation of the Newt Suit, designed by Dr. Phil Nuytten of Vancovuer, BC. His company, Nuytco Research, makes all sorts of wonderful and strange looking underwater craft. The US Navy calls it an ADS since they love acronyms, and don't want to admit they have to buy things from Canada.

    ttyl

    • pnendick says:

      Why must Canadiens constantly justify themselves?

      • kallisti says:

        Because Americans constantly strut around wearing their superpower spurs on the polished wooden floors of the world, leaving their marks, intentionally and unintentionally.

        ttyl

        • pnendick says:

          You are all just proving my point. Who cares what the yanks do? Can't you just be satisfied being Canadien and dispense with the comparison? The whole world is vexed with America's brashness. But unlike the rest of us Canadiens bother to compare themselves to that lot of uncivilised muppets. Entertaining such a comparison demeans Canada.

          If you can't decipher it on your own, the truth is I really enjoy Canada - especially Montreal.

  8. phoenixredux says:

    2,000 feet? That's absolutely amazing. I don't think that the average person can phathom how deep that is.

  9. ciphergoth says:

    Words can't express the extent to which I would not do that.

  10. wfaulk says:

    At 2,000 feet, I had topside turn off all the lights, and it was like a star show. The phosphorescence that was naturally in the water and in most of the sea life down there started to glow. When I started to travel back up, all the lights looked like a shower of stars going down as I was coming up. It was the best ride in the world.

    In summary: "My God; it's full of stars!"