The future used to be awesome.

Space Colony Artwork 1970

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34 Responses:

  1. When I was a kid I had a book with that first one in it -- I never noticed the beach umbrella! Even in space, you can lay out.

  2. prog says:

    It's like an Arthur C. Clarke / James Lileks mashup.

  3. jayrtfm says:

    The artist is Don Davis whose site is http://www.donaldedavis.com/

    A really good listing of space art is at http://www.hobbyspace.com/Art/index.html

    And if you want to actually DO something about making this real, check out http://www.hobbyspace.com/Active/index.html and especially http://www.space-frontier.org/ and the organization founded by Gerard K. O'Neill http://ssi.org

  4. psymbiotic says:

    No doubt, these paintings were inspirational for this:

    Egan

  5. inoah says:

    I had a book with both of those pictures in it. Years later, when reading Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous With Rama, I realized the bottom picture is probably a lot like what he had in mind--if indeed the artist didn't get inspiration from that very book.

    • jwz says:

      The book I had with those pictures was Colonies In Space (1977), was it the same one?

      I love this line in the Amazon reviews: "This is a very good book and honestly my favorite book of all non-fiction (excepting scripture, of course)."

  6. boldra says:

    Just look how big CDs were in 1970:

    We've come a long long way.

  7. substitute says:

    Oh wow I totally had all this art as a kid. I probably still have some in poster form. FLASHBACK CITY

  8. It's like Halo... only peacful... with space yuppies.

  9. lordshell says:

    The future's still awesome, it's just got crappier aesthetic designers now.

  10. autodidactic says:

    My ex had a book in his childhood that talked about being on Mars by sometime in 1990. At sixteen, in 1990, he was inexplicably depressed.

    I remember all the kickass art from all the issues of OMNI that my mom's roommate would kick me. My bedroom walls were covered with it until I graduated to frosted-haired prettyboy rockstars.

    L.

    • Bradbury had some short stories about living on mars in 1990. I loved them, but now they make me sad.

      Where is my rocket car?

      • deafscribe says:

        You'd probably enjoy Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars, Green Mars, Blue Mars series. And get a copy of the Traveler's Guide to Mars by William K. Hartmann, as a companion piece.

        We used to dream big. Of all the things we've lost since the 70's, I think that's the most profound. I love William Gibson's writing, but the bitter cynicism that underlies his style sadly - and accurately - reflects our times.

        • dzm6 says:

          I read Red Mars, Green Mars, and Blue Mars years ago. Found them to be completely tedious and pointless. Then I decided that maybe I was too harsh and recently started reading them again. Turns out that (so far) they're still tedious and pointless.

          • deafscribe says:

            YMMV. Lately I've been reading John Varley's stuff for the first time, and he's good, but he doesn't knock my socks off the way he does others. I think after a certain point, you get jaded and it seldom seems there's anything really new under the sun.

  11. 1eyedkunt says:

    that first one is kinda how i imagined freeside in neuromancer, only more mall-like, less grass.

  12. nelc says:

    Is there a word for when you remember when something was new and exciting, but now it's so old that everybody's forgotten it, and now it's new again? But unfortunately styled?