drilling

Hundreds killed in Nigerian pipeline explosion:

At least 150 people were killed today when a petrol pipeline exploded in Nigeria as locals tried to siphon fuel from it, police said. Around 50 burned corpses could be seen lying on the sandy beach near an area of the pipeline close to the waterside village of Ilado, about 28 miles east of Lagos, Nigeria's commercial centre. The Red Cross said the pipeline blew up while locals were drilling into it, igniting about 500 cans full of fuel that were lying nearby, apparently full of fuel that had been siphoned off.

There were drilling marks in several places on the pipe. A few of the bodies were floating in the sea. Despite its oil riches, the impoverished people of Nigeria often tap into pipelines, seeking fuel for cooking or resale on the black market. The pipelines often go through poor areas, but drilling into them is highly dangerous as the fuel can be so volatile.

Thieves Drill For Gas In Local Vehicles:
Sacramento Police report that thieves are drilling for gas -- not from wells -- but directly from vehicle's gas tanks. Crooks get under cars with a drill and make a hole in the gas tank, draining it. Police say that this isn't a rare occurrence. Thieves have struck several times in the last week the same way, and authorities expect that it will get worse as the price of gas continues to climb.
Black Water Market Drying Out Spain:
Enough water to supply 58 million people is stolen from Spain's underground reserves each year, drying out already-parched land to feed the lucrative property, tourism and agricultural sectors, a report warned on Thursday.

The World Wildlife Fund said there was a hugely profitable black market in water extracted from around 510,000 illegal wells throughout Spain. Southern Spain is already one of the driest parts of Europe and according to the government, a third of the country is in danger of turning into a desert.

The report estimated that around 3,600 cubic hectometres of water are stolen each year -- only 25 percent less than the whole country uses legally.

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25 Responses:

  1. loosechanj says:

    New band name: Nigerian Pipeline Explosion.

  2. ichae says:

    Enough water to supply 58 million people is stolen from Spain's underground reserves each year

    That strikes me as rather odd... how can you steal underground water? I mean, do people sneak onto private property, dig a well, and pull out water? Or is there some kind of inane law in Spain that you can't drill a well on your own property?

    • ultranurd says:

      Presumably the aquifers extend over a large area, so wells drilled from your property could pump more water than the legal limit.

      • dasht_brk says:

        Right.

        Ichae, are you in California? Are you even vaguely familiar with, for example, issues about the Colorado River? Salmon fisheries in N. California, etc?

        Think of the "inane" laws as crudely analogous to those against drawing more current than you pay for from the electricity grid. Ok, sure, there isn't (except when there is) a "generator" in water world, but the circuit logic still applies.

        -t

  3. lars_larsen says:

    Power drill + gasoline pipeline =

  4. fo0bar says:

    I would like to point out to the world that my prius has a 10-gallon gas tank. Please, siphon the chevy silverado next to it, with the dual 50-gallon tanks.

  5. dojothemouse says:

    Finally she leveled the 'scope toward the horizon, out past the vast dangerous triad-ridden suburbs, where millions of Shanghai's poor had been forcibly banished to make way for highrises. Beyond that was real agricultural land, a fractal network of canals and creeks glimmering like a golden net as they reflected the lambency of the sunset, and beyond that, as always, a few scattered pillars of smoke in the ultimate distance, where the Fists of Righteous Harmony were burning the foreign devils' Feed lines.

    Diamond Age

  6. taiganaut says:

    I believe it, re: Spain. When I was there last summer, water was a luxury. It was a crapshoot whether you'd be able to get up and take a shower, whether that shower would last more than about 2 minutes, etc. Whole portions of the city barely had any pressure, and usually only late at night.

    • wilecoyote says:

      Uh.

      Where in Spain did you go? Because here in Madrid we're not having any problems at all (though there are plenty of PR campaigns advising citizens to save water). Now, if you're talking about the south, then I can buy it.

      • taiganaut says:

        Salamanca. It was like that for the whole month. Fortunately bottled water was comparatively way cheaper than in the US.

      • lostraven says:

        I spent nine days in Madrid, Sevilla, and Segovia this
        past March. I was certainly not aware of the water
        shortages in the country until I saw the PR campaigns
        that you mentioned, predominately in the Metro stations.
        I'm not sure if the Guadarramas use to have significant
        snow cover (and thus beneficial melt-off), but it's my
        understanding that they don't get much snow these days.
        There was only a bit at the peaks when I visited Segovia.

        Just out of curiousity, are there more people moving
        to the north, especially around Galicia?

        -Shawn

        • wilecoyote says:

          From the south of Spain to the north? Not that I'm aware of. I mean, there is a problem of water shortage, but the situation is still very far from "grim meathook future"/massive migration levels.

  7. I like the news clip. I like how they went out of the way to:
    1 - show how to do it(especialy the tip on removing the gas cap)
    2 - and pointing out that most people will NOT report it becase it will drive thier insurance rates up.

    If the crime was not going to become more common before - it will now :/

  8. cyeh says:

    I'm completely unsurprised by people siphoning and drilling for gas. The central valley and San Joaquin county are some of the poorest people in the state. Anything not bolted down will be stolen, and even the stuff that is bolted down will probably be taken anyway.

    It's not uncommon for plumbers to install new copper pipe during housing construction and then come back the next morning to see that it was hack-sawed out in the middle of the night.

    • down8 says:

      Stockton is a shit-hole (I live in Lodi), and only comparable in the valley to Fresno, in it's shit-holeness. And possibly Bakersfield, though I don't wory as much about my car being stolen in BFD. I'd say there's more money in Stockton than in the southern valley, too, being a big commuter town.

      -bZj

  9. down8 says:

    What happened to all the rain in spain that falls on th-... nevermind....

    -bZj

  10. luserspaz says:

    DEAR SIR,

    I HAVE BEEN REQUESTED BY THE NIGERIAN PETROLEUM COMPANY TO CONTACT YOU FOR ASSISTANCE IN RESOLVING A MATTER. THE NIGERIAN PETROLEUM COMPANY HAS UNCOVERED AN EXCESS OF 1.7 MILLION GALLONS OF PETROLEUM. BECAUSE OF CERTAIN REGULATIONS OF THE NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT WE ARE UNABLE TO TRANSPORT THIS PETROLEUM TO A FOREIGN COUNTRY.

    WE REQUIRE YOUR ASSISTANCE TO TRANSFER THIS QUANTITY OF PETROLEUM TO AN AMERICAN STORAGE LOCATION. IF YOU CAN ASSIST US IN THIS MATTER WE ARE PREPARE TO OFFER YOU 10% (170,000 GALLONS) OF THE TOTAL.

    IN ORDER TO PROCEED HOWEVER THE HOLDING COMPANY REQUIRES A DEPOSIT OF US$10,000 TO A NIGERIAN BANK TO RELEASE THE PETROLEUM. IF YOU CAN ASSIST US IN THIS MATTER PLEASE CONTACT US AT [redacted].

    BEST REGARDS

    //obvious?