We're going to play a game. It's called, "Is There a God?"

Father apologizes for teen daughter accused of serving poisoned cake to classmates

The father of one of two 13-year-old girls accused of serving poisoned cake to about a dozen students said Thursday he and his daughter were sorry it happened.

The girls were held on assault charges Wednesday, a day after handing out the cornbread cake at East Cobb Middle School.

Lab tests showed the icing contained an expired prescription drug, bleach, clay and hot-pepper sauce, police said. Eleven students who ate it were treated at a hospital and released.

Both teens were charged with 12 counts of aggravated assault with intent to commit murder. One girl was also charged with terroristic acts and interference with government property. Both are still in custody, the father said.

Because the investigation is ongoing, Cobb Police Department spokesman Dana Pierce declined to comment on exactly how dangerous the cake was believed to be, saying only that it was potent enough to cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

The father said the two girls began playing around in the kitchen Tuesday after growing bored. "It was not any kind of malicious intent," he said. "They thought it would be funny. They know it's not funny now."

The father said his daughter was diagnosed this summer with Asperger's syndrome, and that doctors told him the girl should not be in a conventional school setting. Asperger's is an autism-related condition characterized by social and communication deficiencies.

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38 Responses:

  1. xoruglm says:

    I think I might have Asperger's syndrome. Maybe.

    • spider88 says:

      Well, this is a quick and dirty screening test: At the age of 13, would you have required an explicit explanation as to why feeding people poison cake wasn't funny? Or why people would be upset if you did think it was funny?

      Though one wonders if the kid wasn't fully aware - Asperger's kids are often picked on. Perhaps a revenge on her part.

    • icis_machine says:

      that girl was socializing waaaayyy too much for her asperger's to be the blame.

      giving people cake involves speaking and being persuasive.

  2. reddragdiva says:

    I'm wondering WTF is up here. This is the latest in a recent series of news articles I've seen in the past few weeks about antisocial crimes attributed to Asperger's. I have a pile of Aspergic friends who don't in fact do things like this.

    • lilamp says:

      parents will jump at anything to blame for their children's behavior other than their own parenting...

    • cyeh says:

      Asperger's is a spectrum disorder,like Autism. This means that there are three or four major elements that will get you a diagnosis, but the severity that each element presents itself will vary greatly from person to person. There's such a thing as 'mild' to 'severe' Asperger's, just as there are high-functioning autistics such as Temple Grandin to the blubbering screaming adult down the street.

  3. scjody says:

    I'm a no rust buildup man myself.

  4. jonxp says:

    So I went to that Middle School. It's not a bad area at all...almost the last place you'd expect something like this. The headlines all say "Atlanta" but it's actually well outside, in Marietta. Kinda scary how much things change in 10 years.

  5. dontdothat says:

    Lab tests showed the icing contained an expired prescription drug

    It's awesome how lab tests can pick up on that.

    • taffer says:

      Might be possible... a friend of mine's mother is a pharmacist, and apparently drugs have an expiry date because the chemical composition can begin to change after that date, causing unexpected behaviour.

      Or maybe it was a drug that isn't manufactured anymore?

      • simmonmt says:

        Or perhaps they simply figured out what drug it was, and matched that with the drugs they in his house when they searched it.

  6. dygel says:

    "What's in the cake?"
    "Pain."

  7. irma_vep says:

    The father seems a little too low key to me. I think he gave the poison to the girls. It was a group effort.

    • spendocrat says:

      Maybe it's a deeply-entrenched case of denial, like in "The Radio-Active Boy Scout".

      • pathwalker says:

        Dave's father is (as far as I can tell) genuinely and unreservedly proud of Dave, and what he did.

        Every time there was more media coverage (local TV, the Harper's article, the book, the documentary last summer) he'd excitedly contact people who had known Dave, to make sure we wouldn't miss it.

        I guess in his view there is no such thing as bad publicity.

        • spendocrat says:

          I think I would be too. Standard safety concerns notwithstanding.

          The author gives you the strong impression that all of Dave's parental units are pretty oblivious to what he's actually up to, that's all I was referring to. I returned the book to the store. I thought it was pretty awful, despite being a great story (the magazine article that never should have been a book).

  8. wouldn't you notice if you were eating bleach?