I, for one, welcome our new psychic borg-rat overlords.

"There are two neural events that we believe are hallmarks of the 'aha!' moment for the rat," says Linda Hermer-Vazquez. These are high-frequency activity in one subset of neurons, and decreased activity in two other areas, she says.

"Artificial noses don't work well when there are other smells around," says Christiane Linster, an olfaction expert at Cornell University in New York. "Rats are good at that."

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14 Responses:

  1. tdj says:

    Way ahead of you:

  2. 33mhz says:

    I'm getting mental images of Room 101 / The Pit and the Pendulum.

  3. 5tephe says:

    Oh, that one is gold.
    Still, they're going to have to put the radio transmitter inside eventually: the entry sites for those links between the the neural implants and the transmitter are going to be infection loci, and the wires would take any bacteria straight to their nervous system, killing the little bugers.

    Sure, they work well in a lab, but one of those rats in a collapsed building? It would bump that backpack , and get filthy dirty all too easily. Now, while I don't know much about brian surgery in rodents, but I can only imagine that each little guy they use would represent a fair investment... Not exactly disposable.

    Still, great idea.

    • baconmonkey says:

      my understanding is that rats live about 1.5 years on average. Thus these buggers are probably assumed to be pretty much single-use.

    • strangehours says:

      Just like cochlear implants, they could quite easily use induction coils.

      I'm surprised that they haven't thought of cultivating mice with raging cocaine addictions, and using the 'aha moment' to trigger a small detonation. Then the US gubmint could really take the War On Drugs to the Next Level.

  4. minutillo says:

    It's really hard to think of anything more terrifying than being pinned inside a collapsed building and being confronted by bionic rats... trained to love the smell of human flesh.