be my google

So, the power was out at the club last night, and again this afternoon, and will be again tonight, and apparently this is on purpose: a "scheduled outage" of whatever their euphamism is for "we're turning off your lights; you're welcome." They called last week and told us about it ahead of time. But now I'm curious about why (is it construction? did they just feel like it? what?) and I can't find any info on PG&E's site or on the local papers' sites. Surely this stuff gets written down somewhere? Anyone know where?
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20 Responses:

  1. endquote says:

    You were quite entitled to make any suggestions or protests at the appropriate time, you know. The plans have been available in the local planning office for the last nine months, in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet, stuck in a disused lavatory, with a sign on the door saying "Beware of the Leopard."

  2. transiit says:

    For rolling blackouts, I usually keep an eye on caiso.com.

    PG&E appears to have a system status page here

    They also let you be one of their outage shills using this magic device

    From this page, they seem to offer general outage notification through their "Business Tools" program. Registration required (and I'm not going to bother, as I'm neither a business nor a PG&E customer.)

    Go on. Surely, you'll be violating some terms of service or whatnot, but sign up and make an RSS feed of it. Or don't.

    --transiit

    • transiit says:

      replying to my own post, just like a sucker:

      From their business tools faq:

      What's in the outage information site?
      Non-residential customers can see real-time information about electric outages affecting accounts they are authorized to view. The information shown includes:
      The cause of the outage, such as a car/pole accident.
      The status of the outage, such as crew en route.
      The estimated time that a Pacific Gas and Electric Company crew will arrive.
      The estimated time that service will be restored.

      So it's allegedly there somewhere.

      --transiit

      • poindexter says:

        But, how do you get to the site when YOUR POWER IS OUT?

        d'OH!

        • transiit says:

          Laptop would be the easiest way.

          If PG&E decided to do things the right way, they'd have posted scheduled outages on there before they actually happened, you might expect them.

          Call a (friend|associate|crony) on the other side of town that still has power and get them to look it up for you.

          Reasonably modern cellphone would be a painful way, but still mostly effective.

          So were you trying to be witty, or are you really that bad at being resourceful?

          --transiit

    • From this page, they seem to offer general outage notification through their "Business Tools" program. Registration required (and I'm not going to bother, as I'm neither a business nor a PG&E customer.)

      I think you missed a golden opportunity here. I would have written that as:

      From this page, they seem to offer general outage notification through their "Business Tools" program. Registration required (and I'm not going to bother, as I'm neither a business nor a PG&E customer nor a tool.)

  3. marklyon says:

    You know, living in the middle of nowhere suddenly doesn't seem so bad. Dealing with crap like that would drive me nuts.

    Are they going to compensate you for lost business?

    • fo0bar says:

      HAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

      ha.

      No, their rationale is "you didn't use any power during the time when you couldn't use power, therefore we didn't charge you for the power you didn't use, so we don't owe you anything."

    • jwz says:

      Fortunately, we weren't open last night/tonight. (If we had been, I guess we would have rented a generator, and no, I sincerely doubt they would have credited us.)

    • zapevaj says:

      Oh no. Living out in the middle of nowhere means that your power goes out more frequently (unless you've got your own power grid or something). It ALSO means that sometimes your water goes out, too!

      It's lots of fun. I can't wait to move.

      • violentbloom says:

        I live in the middle of nowhere and they're fairly good about keeping both power and water on...
        Though the things that usually cause it to go off are lightening storms and ice storms, the later people die without the heat so I'm guessing that helps.
        I think barring a bad tornado in the early 70s I've never had the water not work because of something not inside the house.

        our directtv has more issues really, the snow sometimes gets stuck on the dish and then we get no signal, and occasionally it just stops working for no reason.

        There's the EDIS notice that goes out about earthquakes, bad air, and serious power outages, I think they have levels of info...I signed up back when I lived there and now I can't remember what the website is to unsign up but there is one somewhere.
        of course its as useless as a website with no power.

  4. netik says:

    It's funny, I wonder if the power was out to the street, or if the power was out just to the DNA?

    Retina's still showing an uptime of 131 days , but then again there's a massive UPS attached to it which should keep it up for a day or so during an outage.

    Hurm. I'd have better stats for you, but I broke my copy of mrtg and smokeping. doh.

    • jwz says:

      I believe last night's outage was under an hour, and this afternoon's was around 45 minutes (nucleus went down but cerebellum didn't -- different amounts of load on their respective UPSes...) If it went down tonight, it was probably less than that (nothing booted, though there was a network outage.)

      • rzr_grl says:

        Your post is timestamped 10:24am Friday. By "went down tonight" and "not open tonight," you actually mean "this morning" or "the darkness attached to last night," correct?

        In other words, DNA was not open Wednesday and Thursday, but *is* open Friday, right?