If you work for Facebook, quit.

If you work for Facebook, quit. It is morally indefensible for you to use your skills to make that company more powerful. By working there, you are making the world an objectively worse place. I'm sure you can find a job working for a company that you don't have to apologize for all the time.

You can do it. I believe in you.

Violet Blue: Why I'm sitting at home crying on a Saturday:

Next, Facebook said that to access my account I had to pass a security test to prove it was me, on the grounds of protecting my account's security. These tests, which I attempted to pass for over an hour, were based on inaccurate information and literally impossible to pass. [...] All paths ended with access to my Facebook account being restored in exchange for me uploading a government ID. Not alternate forms of ID, but a strict and specific list of government-only identification. [...]

I had no less than three people approach me in the following days offering to help me get my account back, special favors style, from the inside. Two were private offers and one was public, from Facebook's own head of security. I wonder how many other journalists who -- like me -- have covered Facebook critically in the past and then found themselves in my position, and took the special favor. Facebook, in fact, holds the particular honor of being one of the first entities I broke a story about, then secretly contacted my executive editors with false accusations about my professionalism while working on the story. [...]

I have since tried to contact Facebook's Security, Privacy, Info and Support departments -- without any special favors from Facebook employees. I have been told (alarmingly, with with increasing incompetence) that I must upload my ID. Facebook has not demonstrated that it is responsible enough, trustworthy enough, or even skilled enough at the basics of user security procedure to be handed a copy of my ID. [...]

Do I want my account back? Only for one reason now. I'm prepared to give up the business reasons I kept a Facebook account, though it is going to make some things very difficult (also not possible) for me as a journalist and author. I want my info, so I know what risks I can expect from the shadow profile Facebook keeps on me and can try to mitigate the risks from rogue employees, powerful authorities, and any absolute bungling fuckup incompetency from Facebook itself, as I witnessed going through its "security questions".

But now I just want out. I want my account deleted. I want the bullshit, inaccurate pages Facebook creates about me without my consent gone, too, but that's just a bitter little joke for the ages, isn't it? Facebook is just going to do whatever the fuck it wants to me. And to you.

Of course, Facebook won't let me delete my circa-2007 account until I give up my ID.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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Yes on F

When a multinational corporation spends $8M to defeat a ballot measure in a single city, it's a foregone conclusion that you should vote for it.

There is literally no chance that doing what they want is in your best interest, unless you are on their board.

The Top 9 People and Companies Cashing in on Airbnb's $8 Million Campaign

Airbnb's jawdropping $8 million expenditure to defeat the ballot measure that would strictly regulate short-term rentals in San Francisco has the No on Proposition F campaign on track to become one of the most expensive in San Francisco history. With five weeks to go, Airbnb trails only the American Beverage Association ($9.2 million to defeat the soda tax in 2014) and PG&E ($10.8 million in 2008 to defeat public power).

Airbnb's $8 million far outstrips the $5.6 million that all 14 mayoral candidates combined spent in the 2011 election.

You may have read an astroturf blog post against Prop F; read this instead.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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"Being a US citizen did not entitle me to rights that I probably thought", says TSA.

Small town mayor relinquishes electronics and passwords to agents at SFO

Stockton, California Mayor Anthony R. Silva attended a recent mayor's conference in China, but his return trip took a bit longer than usual. At the San Francisco International Airport (SFO) this week, agents with the Department of Homeland Security detained Silva and confiscated his personal cell phone among other electronics. According to comments from the mayor, that may not even be the most alarming part.

"Unfortunately, they were not willing or able to produce a search warrant or any court documents suggesting they had a legal right to take my property," Silva told SFGate. "In addition, they were persistent about requiring my passwords for all devices."

The mayor's attorney, Mark Reichel, told SFGate that Silva was not allowed to leave the airport without forfeiting his passwords. Reichel was not present for Silva's interaction with the DHS agents, either. The mayor was told he had "no right for a lawyer to be present" and that being a US citizen did not "entitle me to rights that I probably thought," according to the paper.

(Also, "rights" by definition are not "entitlements", you illiterate motherfuckers. If you've sworn to uphold the Constitution and you can't explain the difference between rights and privileges, maybe you don't deserve its protection either.)

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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Sarlacc Ball Pit


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Frank Carson: Invisible Architecture

I don't know what this nonsense is, but it looks very "esoteric" in a Time Cube sense.

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Fucking Pepper the Robot is strictly prohibited by the EULA

Prohibited matter: Robotics Corporation determines by an act I suppose you shall not:

(1) any act in violation of the laws and regulations, acts contrary to public order and morals [...]

(4) act for the purpose of sexual or indecent act, or encounter with the opposite sex unacquainted Act for the purpose of and companionship

(5) Advertising of commercial, act of sending spam e-mail [...]

(8) act of disseminating false information

(9) stalking

(10) The act of impersonating the Company or a third party

(11) providing a criminal act or criminal act, and auxiliary to or foment act

(12) profit sharing and other cooperation acts against antisocial forces [...]

(18) Any other activities that the Company deems inappropriate

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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Best exit ever

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X-ray guns, or X rayguns:

Roy Livingston:

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How America's corporations got their own private legal system

In 1925, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations of similar size and bargaining power could use arbitration, rather than courts, to settle their differences; today, corporations demand that customers and employees agree to use the arbitration system for redress of any grievances, while reserving the right to use the courts to attack humans who offend them. [...]

The largest arbitration company in America, the for-profit National Arbitration Foundation, is owned by investors who also own one of the country's largest debt-collection agency -- and many debt-collection cases get settled in arbitration.

How unbalanced is arbitration? Out of 18,075 debt-collection cases handled in California by the NAF, just 30 were settled in favor of humans. When humans do win against companies, they collect much smaller settlements than they would in court, too.

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