Recent movies, Singularity edition

How did I end up seeing four Singularity movies in a row? Normally I'd say "bad decision-making", but three of them were actually good:

The Machine: Military reconstructive prosthetics lead to accidental hive-minding. Very pretty, nice effects. Naked robot fu.

Her: Siri is a really great girlfriend, until she ascends. People are remarkably supportive of someone dating their phone (that's how you know it's science fiction). It's way better than I expected it to be.

Transcendence: This was complete bullshit. Fuck this movie.

The Congress: Lawyers ruin everything, including the Singularity, which looks exactly like Toontown. This movie is bizarre and absolutely fantastic. It never occurred to me that Chuck Jones might be the architect of our drug-addled post-physical existence. That whole "lawyers ruin everything" thing was a given, though.

Previously.

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7 Responses:

  1. Jef Poskanzer says:

    Did you catch the new Boondocks this week? It was also about dating Siri!

    And there's a made-for-SyFy movie on tonight called Isa, which might be a fifth Singularity flick for you. Annalee says it's good.

    • jwz says:

      Never liked Boondocks.

      I also have no time for io9. As far as I can tell, nobody who writes for them actually reads or enjoys science fiction -- what they like is television fantasy, a genre that sometimes includes rayguns.

      Which explains why 90% of their content is "what new swill did SyFy license this week, because we're going to 'love' it even if we have to do so ironically".

  2. eric says:

    Have you seen Waltz with Bashir? Same director as The Congress, great movie.

  3. Tom Armitage says:

    Oh man, The Congress. So excited to see people's reactions to it now - I saw it as part of the London Film Festival and just sat there, agog.

  4. hattifattener says:

    Unexpected future shock here from the realization that "People are remarkably supportive of someone dating their telephone" is a phrase that is perfectly sensical for a non-comedy, non-far-future, mass-audience movie, in the way that "People all have flying cars they use to commute to work" made sense in the 1950s.