"That what Occupy Sesame Street about."

Cookie Monster says:

Yes, there always going to be rich and poor. But we used to live in country where rich owned factory and make 30 times what factory worker make. Now we live in country where rich make money by lying about value of derivative bonds and make 3000 times what factory worker would make if factories hadn't all moved to China. Capitalism great system. We won Cold War because people behind Iron Curtain look over wall, and see how much more plentiful and delicious cookies are in West, and how we have choice of different bakeries, not just state-owned one. It great system. It got us out of Depression, won WWII, built middle class, built country's infrastructure from highways to Hoover Dam to Oreo factory to electrifying rural South. It system that reward hard work and fair play, and everyone do fair share and everyone benefit. Rich get richer, poor get richer, everyone happy. It great system.

Then after Reagan, Republicans decide to make number one priority destroying that system. Now we have system where richest Americans ones who find ways to game system -- your friends on Wall Street -- and poorest Americans ones who thought working hard would get them American dream, when in fact it get them pink slip when job outsourced to 10-year-old in Mumbai slum. And corporations have more influence over government than people (or monsters).

It not about rich people having more money. It about how they got money. It about how they take opportunity away from rest of us, for sake of having more money. It how they willing to take risks that destroy economy -- knowing full well that what could and would happen -- putting millions out of work, while creating nothing of value, and all the while crowing that they John Galt, creating wealth for everyone.

That what the soul-searching about. When Liberals run country for 30 years following New Deal, American economy double in size, and wages double along with it. That fair. When Conservatives run country for 30 years following Reagan, American economy double again, and wages stay flat. What happen to our share of money? All of it go to richest 1%. That not "there always going to be rich people". That unfair system. That why we upset. That what Occupy Sesame Street about.

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18 Responses:

  1. Jim Strathmeyer says:

    "Then after Reagan, Republicans decide to make number one priority destroying that system." Nailed it!

  2. Cookie Monster for President!

  3. If a 10 year old in a slum in Mubai could do your job, well, you didn't have much of a "career" anyway. Sorry, way too many oversimplifications in this occupy movement, so the irony of what Cookie Monster has to say is pretty, err, delicious.

    Yeah, sure, the folks gaming the system have gotten out of hand. That needs work, and a lot of it (see the 60 Minutes segment from a few months ago about companies that employ server farms to analyze trends and buy and then re-sell stocks MILLISECONDS later to make pennies at a time so fast that it turns into millions of dollars per month...to me that's gaming the system, too). I just don't think the occupy movement is in the right place to fix it. DC, baby...

    --Donnie

    • NotTheBuddha says:

      "If a 10 year old in a slum in Mubai could do your job, well, you didn't have much of a 'career' anyway."

      Factory worker isn't a career? Depot repair isn't a career?

  4. I didn't say it wasn't a career. It just isn't much of one if a 10 year old from a slum in Mumbai could do it. That is to say you were going to lose it to SOMETHING, be it a child overseas or automation here. Manufacturing is a different world than it was 50 years ago, and it simply doesn't require SKILLED labor in the volumes it used to. Combine that with the fact that third world companies now have the capability to setup factories that can produce higher end products (and in even more irony, using a lot of open source tools created by folks like jwz) that can compete with our automated factories, and you have a global situation far too complex to simplify down to "they shipped my job overseas."

    • antabakaYT says:

      What is your proposal on improving the American gene-pool so that only people fit enough for high-skilled labor are produced henceforth?

      • I can throw it back on you by asking what your proposal is to somehow FORCE companies to provide jobs for the folks with less skills? And when you do that, let me know how that works in a free market, mkay? It makes no sense. Require a US company to use US labor and they simply lose in the marketplace to competing products created and produced solely by international companies. Oh, don't allow international products, too? Or you have some better way?

        And can you prove it's the gene pool causing a glut in the unskilled labor market and not a failing education system?

        • Colby Russell says:

          You're too generous in your response, I think. Just a "*sigh*" and "Fuck off," would have been sufficient (and probably as effective).

        • piku says:

          If you don't like the education system, go join it and start trying to fix it from within.

          Go and educate children who have no hope of high skilled employment because they're not "academic" enough to pass exams. Then watch these kids fail and leave school with nothing and no hope of employment because there's no low end jobs for them to do.

          No job, no self respect, no community respect... Let's go do drugs and steal some cars.

          Still, at least it's not just the UK where they blame "the education system" for all of societies problems.

          (guess my job ;-)

          • Ben Brockert says:

            "If you don't like the education system, go join it and start trying to fix it from within."

            Congratulations on the thread's least useful answer.

            If you don't like the KKK, join it and start trying to fix it from within.
            If you don't like the Republican party, join it and start trying to fix it from within.
            If you don't like Skrillex, join it and start trying to fix it from within.

            • antabakaYT says:

              "Congratulations on the thread's least useful answer."

              No, I think you got that covered now.
              The education system, as far as I am aware, is not something which has a viable alternative which you could support. Unlike a political party or a group of white-hooded nutcases.

              • Ben Brockert says:

                The issue isn't whether or not there's an alternative, it's whether or not "fix it from the inside" is ever the most viable way to cause radical change. A person has as good odds of reforming the entire countries' education system by joining it at any level as they do getting folks to stop being racists by joining their racism clubs.

        • Erbo says:

          Well, here's the thing. There's no way that American factories can be competitive with Chinese ones, not when the Chinese factories can employ de facto slave labor, and spew poisons into the sky, ground, and water, while the American factories have to pay decent wages and abide by our stricter environmental regulations.

          The solution to that is right in the Constitution: wage- and environmental-parity tariffs on goods from China. When they clean up their environmental problems and pay their workers good wages, the tariffs get lifted. That removes the ability of corporations to arbitrage wages and the environment.

  5. Colby Russell says:

    You're too generous in your response, I think. Just a "*sigh*" and "Fuck off," would have been sufficient (and probably as effective).

  6. HyperActiveX says:

    While you're complaining about how the rich got richer and the poor poorer in your country in the last 30 years, also spare a thought for how that has been working at a global level.

    You say "It not about rich people having more money. It about how they got money. It about how they take opportunity away from rest of us, for sake of having more money." Has it occurred to you that your observation is equally valid if you replace the word "people" with "countries"? And that this has been going on far longer than the last decade or two?

    About that outsourcing to China/ India thing ... when free trade worked for you it was OK, but now that it is not working for you it should be stopped? How is this logic any different from that of the very plutocratic oligarchs in your country that you're criticizing here? Isn't that what they always do - change the rules of the game when they're not winning?

    That 10 y.o. in a Mumbai slum has as much of a moral right to an education and a decent life as your own kids do. I understand you mean no offence to that kid, but I'd encourage you to remember that this problem will not go away when your national economy improves, unless living conditions improve for the rest of the world too. You can't have islands of unfairly-begotten prosperity ... not at a national level, nor at an international level. So do take a broader perspective, please. If you believe in the principle of equal access to opportunity, then uphold it at a global level, or else don't believe in it at all.

    • Devon Dossett says:

      tackle the problem on a massively impossible global scale, or suck it up and accept things as they are?
      no thanks.
      That's like saying "Work solve homelessness on a global scale or do nothing at all; working on a local level and not global level makes you a hypocrite." Grey areas, life is full of them.

      Though as was pointed out above by Erbo, tariffs on impossibly cheap goods produced elsewhere is certainly one way to work on that problem.

      • HyperActiveX says:

        I'm NOT asking you to solve global poverty/ hunger before you solve your own economic problems. In fact I'm not even asking you to solve any global problems at all - just to THINK of the "big picture" before you go beat up on outsourcing. And to be consistent in your belief system (e.g., equal access to opportunity for all humans). Unless your sense of nationalism compels you to have a different set of standards for Americans versus others.

        Yes, outsourcing "externalizes" costs, and if there aren't stringent environmental and labor laws to comply with at destination locations, corporations will look for every opportunity to exploit all the resources at their disposal. Unless they're conscientious and "truly" socially responsible, which few are. That said, outsourcing does provide economic opportunities to low-wage markets which they would otherwise not have been able to access. That's the half-full part of the glass. You can't reverse globalization but you can make corporations compensate host economies for the externalized costs. That will reduce the attractiveness of outsourcing in cases where wage arbitrage is the only value driver (it isn't so in all cases).

        Anyway, the root cause of your disproportionate inequality is not outsourcing - it is the cheating and thievery that rogue bankers have been indulging in over a period of time. It is the crony capitalism of the big players that de-regulated financial markets such that rogue bankers could game the system and get away with it. It is the myopic greed of a hyper-consumerist society which thought the "borrow and consume now, pay later" mantra would last forever. True, outsourcing is not helping you fix what's broken, but it's not what caused it to break in the first place.

  7. bob says:

    That 10 year old is not working vokuntarily... Hes probably working from a script with no skills at all. Why do you think hes such a cheap worker? Why do you think offshore work is so shoddy?