DNA Lounge update

DNA Lounge update, wherein there are photos of Chromatics, and I hype Mortified.
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and now the news:

  • Libya Ferrets Out Gadhafi's Taint
  • Rick Perry's execution record greeted by wild applause from Republicans
  • Weatherman Wakes Up Next To Corpse In Bathtub

    Brett Cummins, a 33-year-old KARK meteorologist, woke up on Monday in a bathtub next to a corpse wearing a dog collar on, his friend Christopher Barbour told police.

    According to a report by Fox Dallas-Fortworth, Barbour told authorities Cummins brought a friend, Dexter Williams, to his house the night before, and that the three of them proceeded to drink and "snort drugs."

    The next morning, Barbour found the two next to each other in an empty bathtub, Williams was wearing a dog collar. Dexter was not conscious and his face was a different color. The weatherman then left the house, but insisted he would return.

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Normal girls. Normal walk.

Previously.

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New Social Network Connects People Based on Gastrointestinal Bacteria

This one's for Eric.

A German nonprofit, called MyMicrobes, is hoping you'll want to get your gut bacteria's genomes sequenced. It's expensive, but you'll get access to one of the most exclusive social networks around, where people worldwide can, um, talk about their gastrointestinal difficulties with like-minded people. Two grand seems cheap when we put it like that! [...] It's expensive to start--it'll cost about $2,100 to get your gut bacteria sequenced, which involves mailing a fecal sample to Germany (seriously).

I don't know about you, but I mail fecal samples to Germany all the time!

Previously, previously.

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Uranium-eating bacteria have semiconductor hair.

Helpful uranium-munching bacteria breathe it through electric wires

Bacteria have long been fighting on the front lines of uranium-contaminated groundwater. Their ability to take uranium out of a solution and mineralize it has proven invaluable at abandoned uranium mines. The mechanism by which they accomplish this fortunate feat has remained a mystery--until now. [...]

So, do these bacteria produce an enzyme that helps them process uranium in this way, or is there something else going on? That's been the question for some time now. A group of microbiologists suspected that pili--tiny, thread-like appendages on the surface of many bacteria--might have something to do with it. [...]

The second study discovered that the pili of that same Geobacter species are electrically conductive. In fact, they are just as conductive as metallic nanowires. As if the first example of metal-like conductivity in a biological structure wasn't enough, the researchers were even able to get films of these bacteria to function as transistors.

Previously, previously.

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